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Welcome to Allergy Free & Cheap Like Me!

gluten, dairy, egg & soy free

I’m so happy you are here! I hope to create a place for you to find lots of information about food allergies, as well as, lots of goodies to help you not only eat better, but more affordably! Please feel free to share all of your own tips, tricks, and recipes too! Thank you for stopping by and I hope to see you again very soon! You can read more about my allergy story here.

Friday, August 26, 2011

Healthy Crumbs Week: Feedback Friday: Gluten: Where to Find It

HEALTHY CRUMB: FEEDBACK FRIDAY

Gluten: Where to Find It!

I often get ask, what foods contain gluten? Here is a list of foods and ingredients that often contain gluten. You must become an excellent label reader, gluten is hidden in so many ingredients. 

The following are the grains and starches gluten is found in:
Wheat
Couscous
Semolina
Wheat Germ
Farina
Spelt
Wheat Grass
Graham Flour
Triticale
Rye
Kamut
Oats*
Barley
Matzo
Oat Bran*
Bulgur
Seitan
Oat Fiber*

*Oats may contain gluten due to easy cross contamination. Oat fields frequently have wheat or rye growing in them and therefore most oats show gluten contamination when assayed. If contamination doesn't happen in the fields it often occurs in transport or at the manufacturing facility. You can find certified gluten free oats from a few companies. Bob's Red Mill, Creamhill Estates, and Gluten Free Oats.  Bob's being the most readily available. Bob's offers certified gluten free oats as well as oats that are not gluten free, so check the packaging to make sure you are getting the oats specifically stated as gluten free.

The following is a list of foods/ingredients that MAY containing gluten (check labels!):
Breading
Marinades
Seitan
Broth
Meat Balls
Self-Basting Poultry
Coating Mixes
Meat Loaf
Soup Bases
Communion Wafers
Meat Substitutes (Tofurky, etc…)
Soy-Based Veggie Burgers
Crab Cakes
Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
Soy Sauce
Croutons
Pastas
Stuffings
Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein ("wheat")
Processed Meats
Textured Vegetable Protein ("wheat")
Imitation Bacon
Roux (common sauce base)
Tamari
Imitation Seafood
Sauces
Thickeners
Malt or Malt Flavoring, Malt Vinegar(usually from barely and corn)
Sausages
Vital Wheat Gluten (found in imitation meat)
Caramel Coloring
Vinegars (often a derivative of gluten containing grains, especially distilled vinegar.)
Vegetable Gum
Rice Syrup
Blue Cheese (the mold usually originates on old bread)
Vitamins and Supplements

Alcohol
Beer is made from grains therefore it contains gluten. Alcohols such as scotch, rye, and vodkas, while made from grains that contain gluten, have been distilled removing the gluten, making them safe to consume. Keep in mind that alcohol when mixed with gluten in food seems to magnify the reaction of gluten and should be avoided. 

Soy
Soy has some negative characteristics. Soy foods are one of the most common sources of hidden gluten. Seitan and most soy-based veggies burgers contain "vital wheat gluten", the ingredient that gives those foods the texture and taste of meat. Despite being gluten free, soy beans often provoke digestive bloating, gas, and allergic symptoms. As a bean they contain the same lectins that grains have. 

You must become an excellent label reader. Many products say they are gluten free but contain ingredients such as oats, hemp, wheat grass, malt or wheat starch with may contain gluten. Also be wary of food additives labeled as "natural flavorings", "spices", or "extractives of…" If in doubt don't consume the product unless you have written the company or called to verify the product is indeed gluten free. Most companions are forthcoming about whether or not their product is gluten free. So do your research!

I hope this helps shed some light about the foods and ingredients gluten is in. Whether you are new to a gluten free diet or have been following one for a while it is always good to remind ourselves how many foods and ingredients do contain gluten and make sure we are reading our labels. 



11 comments:

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  3. brinkka2011 says: Bravo, your opinion is useful

    ReplyDelete
  4. Is there a simple way to determine if you are gluten sensitive?

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  5. I want to be allergy free. I have had allergies for 30 years!

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  6. This is amazing. I never had any idea that so many things have gluten in them.

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  7. Mark, try this simple at home test to see if you are gluten sensitive.
    This is what you do:
    1. Eliminate all gluten products from your diet, including the related grains such as rye, oats, wheat germ, etc.
    2. Eat none of the gluten products for 7 whole days. You can do it for 14 days if you wish, but 7 should be enough.
    a. (don’t be surprised if for the first few days you have headaches and feel more tired. This is just a side effect of the detoxing your body.)
    3. On the 8th day (or the 15th…), eat gluten for breakfast and gluten for lunch. Pay attention to your reaction. It could take up to a few days before you get a reaction.
    4. If you are going to test oats, rye, etc. also, wait 2 days after your gluten test, so that you don’t mix up any symptoms from your first test with your second one.
    This test should help you figure out how your body is reacting to gluten!

    Annette, yes, when you first start looking at food labels for gluten it seems like it is in everything!

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  8. Dear Elizabeth,
    what a great article! It is very informative. It amazing to know how many foods contain gluten. Your posting is a great source of information. Thanks for sharing!

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  9. Cesar, I'm so happy you found my post informative. I am happy to share what I've learned!

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  10. I'm curious about your soy comment. I had a colonoscopy the other day and was fasting for 2 days. I was pain free. Today after eating soy, the pain is back. Now I am off to cut out soy. Are all soy products the same? Should I also cut out Edamame? Thanks for your thoughts.

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    Replies
    1. OSorganizer, I would definitely cut out Edamame if you are cutting out all soy products. I hope that you find that it helps with the pain once you cut all the soy out. I'm working on a post about soy look for it soon!

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